Mount Hood and the Historic Timberline Lodge

After a less than exciting morning of washing laundry and grocery shopping, we headed up to Mount Hood and Timberline Lodge.  I don’t think I have ever visited Oregon without visiting the lodge. We hadn’t scheduled time for it, but we delayed our move to the coast an extra day because I had to go. It’s tradition. The kids are all old enough now to appreciate its history and craftsmanship, which was great.  We all really enjoyed our time there. It was a lovely drive through the Mount Hood National Forest. Unfortunately, it was very cloudy and most of the mountain was not visible.

National Historic Landmark, Timberline Lodge was constructed during the Great Depression of the 1930’s by craftspeople working under the Federal Works Projects Administration. This stately Cascadian building was constructed of stone and large timbers and has been thoughtfully maintained. Publicly owned, and privately operated, Timberline Lodge is open to the public as a hotel, restaurant, and ski resort. Nearly two million visitors from all over the globe enjoy the lodge’s warm hospitality each year. Forest Service interpretive staff provide tours of the lodge. –http://www.fs.usda.gov/attmain/mthood/specialplaces

Learn more about the lodge’s interesting history here.

Cloud covered Mount Hood

Cloud covered Mount Hood

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Categories: National Forests, Oregon | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

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